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  • feedwordpress 19:34:07 on 2017/11/13 Permalink
    Tags: , , decision making, Francesca Gino, , Kenneth Savitsky, My bodyguard,   

    Six Ways to Make Smarter Decisions By Not Getting Sidetracked 

    David Phillips was rushing up and down the supermarket aisles within seconds after seeing Healthy Choice’s “Early Bird Special.” He bought up all their 90-cent soups in the store. Then he raced over to a discount outlet to get all the brand’s 25-cent chocolate pudding cups. No time to pause. Phillips asked the store manager to order 60 more cases, and then requested the addresses of the chain’s other local outlets. The next weekend he and his mother-in-law to drove a van from Fresno to Davis, buying up all to the pudding cups in those stores. He and his wife…
     
  • feedwordpress 00:36:22 on 2017/11/13 Permalink
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    Four Traits for Becoming More Valued, Visible and Frequently Quoted Ally 

    As an employee one of the best ways to grow your personal brand is to strengthen relationships with your organization’s key stakeholders and unexpected outside allies. Here are four methods to enable you to become a valued ally: 1. To prove you can actually be helpful to a customer or other key stakeholder to the firm – and thus a valued ally – adopt the Triangle Talk approach to connecting with others: A. You B. Me C Us First address one of their specific needs or interests, then cite exactly how you can support that interest, and then ask if…
     
  • feedwordpress 00:45:04 on 2017/11/06 Permalink
    Tags: , Chip Heath, , Dan Heath, Jerry Sternin, Jonathan Haidt, Monique Sternin, positive deviance, Richard Pascale, Save the Children   

    You Can Make Most Any Bad Situation Better 

    When told to tackle the widespread child malnutrition in Vietnam in 1990 as an employee of Save the Children, Jerry and Monique Sternin could easily have become overwhelmed. Plus the country’s foreign minister told them, “You have six months to make a difference.” Instead of looking at the macro problems such as polluted water, he asked the mothers in one village to meet with him to discover, together, the healthiest children and to then discover why. They found that the mothers of healthier kids were feeding their children four meals a day (using the same amount of food as other…
     
  • feedwordpress 19:35:52 on 2017/10/23 Permalink
    Tags: allies, , , clout, , , , Peer2Peer,   

    Seven Traits to Emulate to Become a Sought-After Ally 

    Apart from honing their top talents, guess what renowned surgeon, author and public health researcher, Atul Gawande and billionaire founder of Virgin Group, investor and philanthropist, Sir Richard Branson have in common? They have two vital and intertwined traits in this increasingly complex world where we are drowning in information. They’ve sharpened their ability to be quotable and to be deeply connected to notable people in worlds apart from the one in which they work. In so doing, they are likely to see trends early and be considered thought leaders on a broader stage, thus being able to attract more…
     
  • feedwordpress 12:25:46 on 2017/10/18 Permalink
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    Preparing for 2018 

    October 18, 2017

    I’ve been thinking about the year head. We have 2 1/2 months before it’s upon us, but there are a lot of things we can be sure of already.

    There is no way 2018 won’t be a dramatic one. After all the stress of 2017, it would be nice to think we could have a rest. But there is no way next year is going to be restful. Politically, socially and environmentally, too much is already set up, too many questions will finally be answered, too many stress points will beg to be handled one way or the other.

    But life is never just about what happens to us; it’s about who we choose to be in going through the experience. It serves us to start thinking now about who we are going to be in 2018.

    Today’s Zeitgeist does not center around the drama of any of us so much as all of us. It’s not just our personal but our collective story that is playing out now, and our greatest power lies in imagining ourselves stepping up to the plate and playing our part in a great and glorious planetary renewal that is begging to occur.

    It will either be that, or God help us…

    If you think 2017 was hard, 2018 is going to be a doozy. A nation of wounded birds will not be able to handle this; a gargantuan swath of people for whom words like courage, contribution and responsibility mean nothing will not be able to handle the stress. Everything that’s happened till now has simply been rehearsal for the time that is just ahead.

    This will not be a time for sissies. It will not be a time for whiners. It will not be a time in which any of us will be able to indulge the weaker, softer underbellies of our personality. Our communities, our country, and our world will need us to be strong and amazing and devoted and creative in ways we have never been before. And we are more ready to do that than we know, not because of anything we ourselves can take personal credit for but because of Who is alive in all of us.

    We might not feel ready, but God is always ready. Inwardly, it is time to move aside now and let Him drive. There is no way that you or I, with our puny little personalities, will be able to handle the drama in 2018. But God can and will, as long as we prepare ourselves and surrender ourselves that He might use us on His behalf. The mortal mind got us into this mess, but the mortal mind can’t get us out of it.

    This line from A Course in Miracles comes to mind: “Do not be concerned about your own readiness. Just be consistently aware of mine.” You might want to hold onto that. We are coming upon a time that will once again be a time that tries men’s souls. But make no mistake about it, at the deepest level we can handle this. At the deepest level, we are ready for this. And with God’s help, we got this.

    The post Preparing for 2018 appeared first on Marianne Williamson.

     
  • feedwordpress 14:49:29 on 2017/10/03 Permalink
    Tags: ,   

    Horror in Las Vegas 

    October 2, 2017

    Let us not distract ourselves from the horror of what has happened here. For the 59 who are dead, remember all the parents who have to tell their children that Mommy or Daddy won’t be coming home again, or the grieving lovers and spouses and parent and friends who cannot bear the agony they are going through now. Let us not distract ourselves from thinking about the hundreds, 500 plus, in pain, some now even fighting for their lives. Let us not forget the police and other first responders, the doctors and nurses who have been heroes dealing with this, absolute heroes, confronting a scene of carnage even they were unprepared for. May they all be blessed. May the hand of God be upon them and comfort them in their desperate hour.

    And let us not give in to those who say we should not politicize this, that tonight is not the night, and whatever else they’ll say to distract us from the work to be done. As Jesus overthrew the tables of the money-changers, let us now do the same … and say to those who for the sake of money refuse to allow the things that yes we CAN do … to close the loopholes, to check the backgrounds, to mitigate the risks. NRA, you know who you are. You do not exist to protect the 2nd Amendment; you exist to protect the billions of dollars made by gun manufacturers. We see you, and we know who you are. Politicians who do their bidding, you know who you are…and so do we. Tonight, we will not distract ourselves from this horror. And tomorrow, we will not distract ourselves from the work that it is ours, as citizens, to do. We will not forget this. Enough is enough.

    As of tonight, with God’s help, things will finally change. Amen.

     
  • feedwordpress 18:29:17 on 2017/09/30 Permalink
    Tags: ,   

    Our National Identity 

    September 30, 2017

    Whether as a person or a nation, the question “Who am I?” needs to precede the question “What should I do?”; we cannot know what we should do until we know who we really are. Our principles, values, and deep identity are the guiding principles of wise and right action. Without them we are flying blind, lost in the spiritual darkness of mere self-centered pursuit.

    The United States used to know who we were, even though we have never yet fully embodied the truth of it. We are the home of the brave, endowed by God with the blessings of liberty and justice. And where this has not been true – as in slavery, and the oppression of women, and injustice towards Native Americans, and legalized white supremacy – we understood as a nation that it was our job to fix that. For that is who we are.

    But something has gone terribly wrong over the last 40 years, and it does not serve us to gloss over this. We have sold our identity to the highest bidders, sacrificing our sense of national purpose. We have forgotten our deep identity and the mission, passed along generation after generation, to preserve it. We became distracted by ultimately meaningless things.

    How could it be otherwise, given our lack of commitment to teach civics to all our children (how could they know what we have failed to teach them)? How could it be otherwise, given the increasingly undue influence of money on our politics? How could it be otherwise, given that so many of us left politics to other people to handle?

    Sometimes we become clear about who we are in part by getting clear about who we are not. We are not only a Christian nation, for instance; we are a religiously pluralistic nation. Our Founders said so and we need to keep it that way.

    We are not a nation where might makes right; we are a nation where truth and justice make right. Our Founders said so and we need to keep it that way.

    We are not a nation where only some are entitled to the gifts of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness; we are a nation where God himself has granted all of us those inalienable rights. Our Founders said so and we need to keep it that way.

    Only when we remember who we are as a nation can we have a clear sense of what we are to do. America has a promise to keep, not only to ourselves but to the ages. Here, on this land, we will honor the democratic principles that ensure all men and women the right to be free, to create our own destiny, actualizing according to the dictates of our own conscience and the work of our own hands the life we choose to manifest. Any force, either external or internal, that would seek to limit our capacity to do that is a threat not only to us but to our historic charge. Part of our deep identity is not only our freedom but our commitment to that freedom; not only our democracy but our willingness to sacrifice for our democracy; not only our sacred first principles but our fealty to those principles particularly when they are under threat.

    Today they are under threat and it is time for us to show who we are. We must push back those threats, stand up to those threats, and dismantle those threats. It is true that they are fierce, but when we remember who we are and why we are here then so are we. Now, as has been true since our founding almost two and a half centuries ago, there is a sense that something bigger is at stake here than simply our own desires. These are disturbing times for America’s soul, and for America’s politics, but the light at the center of who we really are and our sense of political purpose will yet prevail.

     
  • feedwordpress 14:55:19 on 2017/09/29 Permalink
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    Politics From the Inside Out 

    September 29, 2017

    I think of traditional politicians as political mechanics. And some of them are very good ones too. But the problem is that society is not a machine, with parts that can just be tinkered with to make things right. Tinkering with a bill here, tinkering with another kind of legislation there — these are all external remedies, but our biggest problems are not external. External problems are just symptoms, and just treating the symptom doesn’t treat the disease.

    Jobs, for instance….Politicians keep saying that people want jobs. Well of course they do. But that’s just the problem that shows on the outside. What people are living with, in their hearts, late at night when they live with little but their own thoughts, is a level of chronic economic despair that simply getting a job doesn’t totally stave off. Economic despair isn’t due only to the fact that someone doesn’t have a job. Even when you have a job, so little feels secure today. The fear is still with you, whether it’s a fear of not having a job or fear that you’re going to lose the one you have.. It’s due to the fact that someone doesn’t have health care, and doesn’t know what they would do if they got sick. It’s due to the fact that someone doesn’t know how they will pay for their kids to go to college, or how they themselves will pay off their college loans. It’s due to the fact that huge conglomerates and billionaires seem to hold all the power today, power even over our government, so that more and more the average person feels squeezed out of the mainstream and into a pool of ultimate insignificance. And this makes people unhappy; how could it not? Unhappy people grow weary, and weary people are too tired to fight off the accumulated assaults on both body and soul that are with us all the time today.

    That’s not something a mechanic can fix. Our political mechanics are part of a system that has brought us to where we are today. Given the state of the world, I don’t see how anyone totally adept at our political system has too much to brag about. We need more than political car mechanics in Washington. What we need is a new car, and what we need more than anything else is a deeper understanding of the people who are in it.

    We need a politics from the inside out. You can’t change anything only by changing things on the outside… Not a business, not a relationship, not an organization, not a life. Only temporary change can happen that way. What we need now is a renewed conversation about what it means to be human, in our politics as much as everywhere else. That’s what our Founders were talking about. How we are created equal. How we have inalienable rights, not just because we are entitled brats who want what we want but because we are given those rights by God. How it is the natural state of humanity to be free of tyranny, political or economic or any other kind. How to establish a society that honors those things. We have strayed from the important existential questions of life, and that is why our politics are sick. They do not speak either to our depths or from our depths. They are shallow and selfish and greedy and corrupted. They do not display the purity of heart that is the truth of who we are as people. Until that changes, our country will continue on a perilous course. But when that changes, we will begin to heal in the twinkling of an eye.

     
  • feedwordpress 00:24:32 on 2017/09/28 Permalink
    Tags: , bended knee, , Deborah Tannen, , Michael Krans, Robert A. Burton MD   

    Feeling Certain? How Our Brains Betray Us 

    Within seconds, an expert can look at a fake painting and know it is not the work of a master. So wrote Malcolm Gladwell in his book, Blink. How? Because the expert’s gut feeling is “perfectly rational.” Not so, writes Robert A. Burton, M.D.in his book, On Being Certain. Even though we may feel certain (“objective”) about our conclusions, we are often “subjectively” wrong. Just like love or anger, certainty is an emotion, not a rational process. Burton’s book provides a warning for the times we dig in, knowing we are right and they are wrong. As Deborah Tannen pointed…
     
  • feedwordpress 11:54:08 on 2017/09/26 Permalink
    Tags: ,   

    The Conscience of Society 

    September 26, 2017

    At a Saturday morning service many years ago, when I was about 14 years old, I heard our Rabbi speak out against the Viet Nam War. I remember how exhilarating it was to me — how for the first time I experienced the moral authority of the religious pulpit, how for the first time religion was really relevant to me. Then several days later I heard my mother remark to my father at dinner, “I hear people are really upset with Rabbi Malev for talking about the war last Saturday.” It was the first time I understood the pressure religious leaders are under to support the status quo, to not upset the apple cart, to go along with what their congregation wants at any particular time. But Jesus himself upset the apple cart when he overthrew the tables of the money-changers. I think spiritual and religious leadership is supposed to be the conscience of a society, answerable not to other people’s projections (particularly as in today, when the projection is often that spiritual means just going along with anything in the name of being “nonjudgmental” and submissive in the name of being “loving”). I’m going to go along with Rabbi Malev at Beth Yeshurun in Houston and Rabbi Jesus at the Temple in Jerusalem. I’m going to remember my ancestors who were thrown in ovens because too few spoke up while there was still a chance. I’m going to cry out with millions of others crying out that humanity has lost its mind and must reclaim its heart. I will do so with tremendous thanks in my heart, that as an American I have the RIGHT to do so. Thank you, Rabbi Malev and thank you, Jesus. Both of you showed the way.

     
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